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Sofisticat
An escape Artist
Thoughtful
Music - - my First ♥
gforangelissa:

#I love you #smile #love me #happy #cute

gforangelissa:

#I love you #smile #love me #happy #cute


Wuthering Heights by Don Jaucian 
My Week with Marilyn (2011)  D: Simon Curtis  S: Michelle Williams, Kenneth Branagh, Dame Judi Dench, Eddie Redmayne, Emma Watson, Dominic Cooper, Zoe Wanamaker, Dougray Scott
Clouded by the pain of the life of a celebrity and the pressure of living up to great expectations, Marilyn Monroe (played by the brilliant Michelle Williams) collapses under the weight of it all. But her mesmerizing charm and ability to hook everyone’s hearts makes her a shady, manipulative character relying on the pegs provided by the people around her to walk. In My Week with Marilyn, her life-size peg is Colin Clark (Eddie Redmayne), a future filmmaker who wants to start a career in the film industry. And just like Peter Brandt in Moneyball, he gets a hell of a first job as Marilyn Monroe’s caretaker (but third assistant director, really) in the production of Sir Laurence Olivier’s The Prince and the Showgirl.
It’s all biopic business from hereon: Monroe’s troubled life and her struggle as an actress. Her delicate position earns her the ire of her co-star and director, who lashes at her for her shortcomings and lateness. But still the admiration is there, as Olivier tritely recalls in a later scene. Everyone goes on how a great actress Marilyn is, something that she doesn’t quite get herself. Curtis trusts us that we already know the doomed persona of Monroe, arguably the biggest film star in history. And this he builds by dwarfing the rest of the cast into a heap of dogs out for Marilyn’s attention: Olivier and his crew desperate to finish the film, her acting coach Paula Strasberg (a creepy Zoe Wanamaker) buttering her up so she can get her act together, and, of course, Clark, her all-around boy who desperately tries to suppress the boner that he has for the actress. 
As a pre-Some Like it Hot Marilyn, Williams is splendid. The Marilyn Monroe Effect is heavily apparent here. Her pre-packaged persona, all dolled-up and smoldering is the towering inferno that makes everyone’s knees weak when she walks by. It’s quite easy to see how Colin fell in love with her, even for those brief moments that they had together would seem an eternity. “Should I be her?” Marilyn asks Colin as adoring fans approach her during her impromptu visit at the Windsor Castle. There is the distance of course between the superstar Marilyn and the stroll-in-the-park-skinny-dipping Marilyn that Colin immortalizes in his memory, but Curtis’s distinction is too artificial, too put on to flesh out the darkness that surrounds the actress. 
On the big screen, it’s not easy to dissociate Williams and the real Marilyn. Williams inhabits Marilyn’s skin, every inch of it brimming with wit, stellar personality, and the right amount of vulnerability. Deep within her eyes, there is a sadness that threatens to overwhelm her, and maybe it did win in the end. 


Wuthering Heights

by Don Jaucian 

My Week with Marilyn (2011)
D: Simon Curtis
S: Michelle Williams, Kenneth Branagh, Dame Judi Dench, Eddie Redmayne, Emma Watson, Dominic Cooper, Zoe Wanamaker, Dougray Scott

Clouded by the pain of the life of a celebrity and the pressure of living up to great expectations, Marilyn Monroe (played by the brilliant Michelle Williams) collapses under the weight of it all. But her mesmerizing charm and ability to hook everyone’s hearts makes her a shady, manipulative character relying on the pegs provided by the people around her to walk. In My Week with Marilyn, her life-size peg is Colin Clark (Eddie Redmayne), a future filmmaker who wants to start a career in the film industry. And just like Peter Brandt in Moneyball, he gets a hell of a first job as Marilyn Monroe’s caretaker (but third assistant director, really) in the production of Sir Laurence Olivier’s The Prince and the Showgirl.

It’s all biopic business from hereon: Monroe’s troubled life and her struggle as an actress. Her delicate position earns her the ire of her co-star and director, who lashes at her for her shortcomings and lateness. But still the admiration is there, as Olivier tritely recalls in a later scene. Everyone goes on how a great actress Marilyn is, something that she doesn’t quite get herself. Curtis trusts us that we already know the doomed persona of Monroe, arguably the biggest film star in history. And this he builds by dwarfing the rest of the cast into a heap of dogs out for Marilyn’s attention: Olivier and his crew desperate to finish the film, her acting coach Paula Strasberg (a creepy Zoe Wanamaker) buttering her up so she can get her act together, and, of course, Clark, her all-around boy who desperately tries to suppress the boner that he has for the actress. 

As a pre-Some Like it Hot Marilyn, Williams is splendid. The Marilyn Monroe Effect is heavily apparent here. Her pre-packaged persona, all dolled-up and smoldering is the towering inferno that makes everyone’s knees weak when she walks by. It’s quite easy to see how Colin fell in love with her, even for those brief moments that they had together would seem an eternity. “Should I be her?” Marilyn asks Colin as adoring fans approach her during her impromptu visit at the Windsor Castle. There is the distance of course between the superstar Marilyn and the stroll-in-the-park-skinny-dipping Marilyn that Colin immortalizes in his memory, but Curtis’s distinction is too artificial, too put on to flesh out the darkness that surrounds the actress. 

On the big screen, it’s not easy to dissociate Williams and the real Marilyn. Williams inhabits Marilyn’s skin, every inch of it brimming with wit, stellar personality, and the right amount of vulnerability. Deep within her eyes, there is a sadness that threatens to overwhelm her, and maybe it did win in the end. 

keykcaffeine:

True best friends stick up for everything. They are with you during fun times, acting all silly, adding up to your happiness. They are also there for you during the hard times, ready for some serious talks. Listening to your senseless rants is what they’re good at, but they are better when it comes to giving advices.
Sympathy. They will never leave you, especially if you’re at the brink of giving up, of losing grip. Instead, they will do their best to motivate you, to make you see that the best has yet to come… that there is no point in giving up… that everything happens for a reason. However cliche it may be, they will always try to put you up, to let you know that you are not alone, and that they care for you. They can’t bear to see you in pain, but they will still lend their shoulders for you to cry on, for they know that it could help you. They just want you to be happy, for it will bring them happiness, too.
Your best friend is your soul sister. She feels what you feel; your hearts are connected — you are one.

keykcaffeine:

True best friends stick up for everything. They are with you during fun times, acting all silly, adding up to your happiness. They are also there for you during the hard times, ready for some serious talks. Listening to your senseless rants is what they’re good at, but they are better when it comes to giving advices.

Sympathy. They will never leave you, especially if you’re at the brink of giving up, of losing grip. Instead, they will do their best to motivate you, to make you see that the best has yet to come… that there is no point in giving up… that everything happens for a reason. However cliche it may be, they will always try to put you up, to let you know that you are not alone, and that they care for you. They can’t bear to see you in pain, but they will still lend their shoulders for you to cry on, for they know that it could help you. They just want you to be happy, for it will bring them happiness, too.

Your best friend is your soul sister. She feels what you feel; your hearts are connected — you are one.



“Everyone is like a butterfly, they start out ugly and awkward and then morph into beautiful graceful butterflies that everyone loves.” -Drew Barrymore

“Everyone is like a butterfly, they start out ugly and awkward and then morph into beautiful graceful butterflies that everyone loves.” -Drew Barrymore

wonderful colors

-makes life beautiful

delight + cravings

Happiness

Happiness

No matter what I say, what i believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love.-1 Corinthians 13:3b
Love means living the way God commanded us to live - John 1:6
—  Purpose Driven Life
Appreciate what you have when it’s there, not when it’s gone
— me


“I know God will not give me anything I can’t handle. I just wish He didn’t trust me so much. -Mother Theresa. 

“I know God will not give me anything I can’t handle. I just wish He didn’t trust me so much. -Mother Theresa.